Christmas Drama Workshops at Spotlites THIS week

Be sure not to miss out THIS week on Spotlites phenomenal Drama Workshops for 5-12s!

Drama Workshops at Spotlites are a magical way to grab a taste of theatre and fun this Christmas! They are also brilliant for introducing children; especially those who are new to theatre, into the beautiful world that helps them bring their favourite stories to life. The exciting new themes allow children to bring the tales close to their hearts alive when they jump into them and become immersed in the enchantment, mischief and fun that follows.

Spotlites amazing team of professional actors are brilliant at engaging each and every child into the joyousness and all have enhanced DBS checks, so you can drop off your children and collect them after the hour. Children can also stay through if they want to take part in more than one workshop, parents do not watch but are welcome to wait in Spotlites new cafe area.

Themes are available to suit all interests from joining the Rainbow fairies to bring some Rainbow Magic into Christmas, voyaging to the Pacific Islands with Moana, firing lasers with the Vision and shooting webs with Spiderman after a civil war breaks the Avengers apart and being whisked away into the mystical world of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child to save Christmas! If Star Wars is more their thing, children can join Rogue One to battle Storm Troopers to steal the plans for the Death Star! Or join Frankie’s Magic Football gang and save the lost elf in time for Christmas!

With the company’s illustrious reputation, style and experience of interactive performance, children of all ages will definitely not be disappointed. Reviewers have shared their thoughts on the experience and they reflect on the brilliance of the workshops offered:

***** “WOW-tastic” – British Theatre Guide

***** “Outstanding” – FringeReview

 

 

 

Dates and themes

Thursday 22nd December 2017:

Christmas Rainbow Magic – Join Holly, Robyn, Stella and her fairy friends for some Christmas magic! (10am-11am)

Moana – Explore the beautiful Pacific Islands as you set about on a voyage with Moana and Maui the demigod to go on a special, secret mission for her ancestors (11am-12pm)

Friday 23rd December 2017:
Frankie’s Magic Football and the Elf Express – Use your football skills in order to get the lost elf back to his world and return in time for Christmas (10am-11am)

Star Wars: Rogue One – Fight with the resistance to steal the plans for the Death Star and battle the storm troopers (11am-12pm)

Avengers: Captain America vs Iron Man – Which side will you be on as a civil war causes the divide of the avengers? (12pm-1pm)

Saturday 24th December 2017 (Christmas Eve):
Harry Potter and the Cursed Child – Use the power of friendship to triumph over the time-turner to save Christmas from the dementors and death eaters! Workshop also contains a small gift for each child taking part! (10am-11am – £10)

Listings Information

Venue: Spotlites @ Kings Theatre, 338 High Street, Chatham ME4 4NR

Production: Drama Workshops for 5-12s

Company: Spotlites Theatre Productions

Dates:

Thursday 22nd December – Christmas Rainbow Magic 10am-11am, Moana – 11am-12pm.

Friday 23rd December – Frankie’s Magic Football and the Elf Express 10am-11am, Star Wars: Rogue One 11am-12pm, Avengers: Captain America vs Iron Man 12pm-1pm.

Saturday 24th December – Harry Potter and the Cursed Child 10am-11am

Time: 10am-11am, 11am-12pm noon, 12pm noon-1pm

Tickets: £8 per child (Saturday 24th December £10 as includes a small gift for each child)

Box office: 01634 829468

Website: http://www.spotlites.co.uk- Book online now so you don’t miss out as we sell out fast!

Spotlites Producer asks cast & crew about their latest show ‘Sleeping Beauty & the Time Lords’

We spent TIME with Spotlites Technical Director Colin, and actors James, Kieron and Zac; here’s what they had to say:

So what makes ‘Sleeping Beauty and the Time Lords’ unique?

CK: It is a play which totally immerses the audience, it is an hour and a bit of fantasy science fiction (Space Opera is the official style) It’s a wonderful way to be a hero and save the day without the exclusion of being plugged into a Playstation oblivious to anyone in the outside world. It is sociable, the audience all have to work together.  The story is a fantastic twist on the classic Sleeping Beauty story, intertwining a parody of Dr Who and allowing the audience to be victorious. The play teaches right from wrong without preaching and shows that even the side-kick thief can turn out to be a good guy after all. Without the kids joining in and learning the Sonic Screwdriver techniques Aurora is doomed, so come join in and save her!

What’s the best thing about working in interactive children’s theatre?

JC: It’s very rewarding work. The effect is almost immediate; it’s delightful to see a parent playing with their child and being caught in their sense of wonderment. Inspiring that feeling and knowing that you’ve helped facilitate a family moment is incredibly fulfilling.

Why should someone bring their family to watch ‘Sleeping Beauty and the Time Lords’?

CK: It is a fun show that really gets the kids drawn into the world of the play, the adventure we all go on is ‘real’ for them. They desperately want to go onstage and help, they want to help the heroes defeat the evil characters in the play, they even cheer when the heroes win. It’s a magical experience and parents really enjoy watching their kids get so involved with the show.

 

What’s your favourite thing that a child has said to you after the show?

KR: I loved it when the robot shot him! Tyler, aged 5.

James, what are you most looking forward to about playing The Doctor?

JC: His inherent sense of mania is always fun to portray. His moral compass is also fascinating; its wonderful to discover which side of ethics he’ll fall down on. He is, in essence, alien. Neither greatly good nor greatly bad, but different. It gives a lot of personality and character avenues to explore.

Kieron, you play more than one character in the play, how do you swop between them?

KR: Swapping character relies on knowing each character’s story inside out. The physical and vocal changes happen only with a lot of practice jumping between one and the other. Costume helps a bit, but that too takes practice when costume changes are less than 10 seconds!

Zac, you’re a newcomer – what’s the best thing about playing Fighter Fairy Guardian F8?

ZM: Learning about wand use and being able to combat using it, for example fighting and using the wand to control Kieron’s character, F-12.

Colin, you create the sci-fi special effects and props – what’s your favourite one?

CK: My favourite prop is the Temporal Chronogram that children from the audience go onstage to build. The design is something the children have drawn earlier in the show and the actors use their diagrams to create the Temporal Chronogram using lots of different electronic bits which are all over the stage which the kids have to find. Obviously I’ve added lots of LEDs and wires to them and made them look more space age.

A Time Lord in @spotlites show

Timelord in Spotlites latest play ‘Sleeping Beauty & the Time Lords’

 

When films can do so much with CGI how can theatre keep up?

CK: By keeping it simple but real and suggestive – I love CGI in films (I’m a sci-fi nut) as it can fully immerse you into the world of the film, but with theatre I try to use the children’s own imagination to create the scenes in the play. So any special effect must be not only impressive but also able to fit into people’s imagination easily which means less crafted detail but with a strong image. For example the spiral copper pipe that is the gold spinning machine in the show. It is simple but also suggestive and really looks the part when Aurora pricks her finger on it. It also is instantly removable by the actors who ‘scavenge’ it during their criminal pursuits. Everyone in the audience knows it is the spinning wheel, even though it looks nothing like a real one, this means they are concentrating on worrying about Aurora and what the Cyberwitch is about to do. A real Grotowski prop!

What’s your favourite part of ‘Sleeping Beauty and the Time Lords’?

JC: It’s a wonderful story; it’s well-crafted, enjoyable and cathartic. As you’re performing the show, you can see the audiences fall into the story and become enthralled by it. There’s something for everyone: good versus evil; a beautiful princess and dashing prince; scientific concepts and apparatus; revenge; retribution; redemption; it’s funny; charming; endearing; and above all a great family adventure at Spotlites!

Have Fun Messing Around with Acting – Spotlites Actor’s Blog

When I was a kid, I was terrified of getting things wrong. I liked to be right (many would argue that this has never changed) and liked to have everything in its rightful place. In mathematics, 2 + 2 will always equal 4. I like that. It’s a simple quandary with one of two outcomes: right or wrong. Kids love right and wrong; usually of the “I’m right, you’re wrong” inclination.

I auditioned for a part in our Year 4 Christmas play of ‘The Ugly Duckling’. I got the part of the Ugly Duckling and loved it. It was 10 minutes long, had fun little dances, nifty songs and everyone clapped at the end. Yippee! Clearly, in my 8 year old mind, I was right for this: this was acting and how it was done.

Then I reached my teenage years and, just like life, acting started to get a little more complicated and, just like life, a little bit infuriating at times.

“What do you mean try it another way? What’s wrong with the way I was doing it?”

“Nothing, I just think you can give a little bit more. Do it a bit differently.”

“Err… okay.”

So as I learned there were many different facets of life, I learned that there were many different facets to performance. And somewhere along the line, a rather young me said:

“Hold on, there’s hundreds of ways to do this! And all of them are right! Maybe that’s not such a bad thing after all.”

After that point, I felt liberated. Not only was I free to change every particle of a performance, there was also no way that I could be ‘wrong’ in what I finally decided to do. My progress sped up exponentially, my performing started to really come alive and I’ve never grown tired of the possibilities of acting and performing. I would even go so far as to say that I didn’t really start acting until I acknowledged this (still loved ‘The Ugly Duckling’ mind!).

I didn’t know what I was capable of all the time I was held back by the fear of failing. But in imagination, you can’t fail. You just are. The more I think about it, the more I realise that theatre will be an equation I’ll never solve. And that’s ok.

An Actor’s blog from Spotlites